11 Experts Predict the Future of Content Marketing in 2018

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From Inc.
 
Reaching the members of your audience through a content-cluttered landscape — and their ad blockers — will be harder than ever in 2018. Fortunately, there are new technologies and techniques that can help.

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5 rare public speaking tricks the best presenters use

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Inc.s Janice Tomich wrote this article, first published on Jun. 25, 2016:

When you’re giving a speech, you need to be different, like Mary Meeker was when she recently delivered her presentation at the 2016 Code Conference.

She challenged the trend of using an image-heavy presentation style delivering 213 data-dense slides in 24 minutes and 40 seconds while sharing her 2016 Trends Report.

Rather than speaking at great length to her slides, Ms. Meeker moved at lightning speed spending about seven seconds on each one.

Image-heavy presentations aren’t the only traditional trends you should avoid. A few more examples:

  • Talk about yourself and your authority ad nauseam
  • Blatantly repeat your key message three or more times
  • Always use a slidedeck — no matter the circumstances
  • Count the number of ums and ahs that pass your lips
  • Sell from the stage

If you fall into the trap of misguided techniques, you’ll be lost in the sea of noise and no different than every other speaker.

How do I know? Whenever it’s possible, I attend my client’s presentations. I sit near the front, close to a wall, so I’m able to do an inconspicuous 180 to evaluate audience reactions. My eyes and ears are listening and watching for the nuances of persuasiveness — those that are connecting and the ones that aren’t.

Here are five things you can do instead of following old-school public speaking instructions if you want to excite your audience:

Provide a skinny version of your CV

I’m talking really skinny. Three or four lines that tell the story of why you are the person who is best suited to speak.

Have someone introduce you and be dogged about having them repeat your short bio word for word. If you’re not able to have someone introduce you with a delicate hand, thread your credentials throughout your speech in places where it aligns conceptually to illustrate your experience.

Be stealth-like when using repetition

What do you think when someone constantly repeats themself to try to persuade you? I think they’re either “a dog with a bone” and are in desperation mode to sell me, or they underestimate my intelligence.

You need to be savvy when building in repetition to have your key message stick into hearts and minds. Use a variety of learning methods or phrase your key message in different ways.

For example, you can ask a question to draw out what you want to be remembered, use the power of gestures to illuminate your point, or switch up every fifth image (the keystones) for contrast in your PowerPoint decks.

There are times you shouldn’t use a PowerPoint deck

We’ve been conditioned to believe that every presentation needs to use a slidedeck and that everyone who can turn on a computer is a graphic design pro.

Ask yourself, “Do I really need slides to support my ideas and can I make it look professional in the time I have?” Consider how you’ll stand out while being different than most presenters when you’re front and center and simply speaking of what you know.

No one is counting your verbal ticks

Toastmasters is a fantastic venue for practicing. It’s a low cost opportunity to create a habitual practice for improving your pubic speaking skills.

There is one aspect of Toastmasters I have issue with. It’s the counting of verbal ticks such as ums and ahs. If I had someone counting the number of times I say “right” it would stress me out.

That aside, you have your unique tics and nuances that make you, you, and without them, you’d come across as predictable and over polished. I do draw a line, though. When verbal ticks are distracting, work to alleviate them so you’ll communicate with easy flow.

It’s not OK to sell from the stage

If you’ve provided a stream of helpful information, those who see you as the one to solve their problem will reach out to you. Whether people contact you or not is one of the strongest indicators of a successful presentation.

You’ve been warned. Old tired techniques will  irritate your audience and put up a barrier to winning them over. Excite them instead. 

Read the original article on Inc.. Copyright 2016. Follow Inc. on Twitter.

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Public Speaking — 4 Ways to Own the Room During Your Next Presentation

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This comes to you thanks to Dale Carnegie and Inc:

By Jordan Scheltgen

 

 
 Jordan is Co-founder and managing partner, Cave Social
 
When you’re on stage, finding your groove starts with finding out what the audience really wants from your presentation. It’s not about what you’re saying, but what they’re hearing.

“And next to the stage, we’ve got Jordan Scheltgen from Cave Social.”

A light, non-enthusiastic applause followed.

As I approached the stage I probably looked like I had seen a ghost. I was anxious, full of adrenaline and had one too many cups of coffee that morning.

The long and short, I was terrified.

See I had played football in front of thousands of people during college. That was fine because I had played my whole life but being on a stage was something completely new.

I was presenting to 300 marketing executives, my now peers, to educate them on how they could incorporate content marketing into their businesses.

I was 25 and looked 18.

This isn’t a benefit when you’re trying to gain credibility in your field. Being young means being perceived as inexperienced and untested — I had an uphill battle to win the crowd.

I started my speech like I do most, “So I was 23 and broke…” and then go on to tell the story of how I stumbled into becoming an agency owner. It was important for the audience to know me before I expected them to listen to me. To give any insight or advice you have to earn the attention of the people you’re talking to.

I’ve found an honest story the best way to do this.

I ended up being on stage for an hour, finding my groove, engaging the audience and settling into my talk. Was it my best presentation, not a chance, but it taught me some valuable lessons I wanted to share with you.

Public speaking is often about the story you tell and the lessons learned over the amount of information you provide. If you want to lose the attention of the audience start rolling out stats, figures, and graphs.

1. Put yourself in the shoes of the audience members.

If you’ve been to a conference before, you know there is always one speaker that could put you to sleep after you’ve chugged four Redbulls and another who is doing a glorified sales pitch.

Audience members don’t want to see these speakers. They want to get value through seeing a different perspective or direct strategic takeaways.

In your presentation, think about two things: How can I get my lesson/point across through a story and (ii) how can I give this audience one actionable takeaway for their own work? If you answer these questions, you’re on a solid path to having a useful presentation.

2. Throw out the script.

Scripted speeches feel unauthentic. This will only drive you further away from connecting with your audience.

This doesn’t mean your presentation shouldn’t have structure–it should. Organize your presentation as a loosely scripted presentation. This means you’ll have talking points but not a word-for-word script to follow.

This turns your speech into a conversation with the audience.

3. Leave ample time for questions.

Even though you’re on stage in a place to speak, you need to make time to listen to your audience.

By hearing their questions directly it does two things: (i) it gives you a chance to demonstrate knowledge and connect with the audience in that room further and (ii) it gives you valuable information to possibly incorporate into future presentations.

4. Be real before and after your talk.

If you’re a speaker at an event you are not better or worse than any attendee there. I refuse to hang out in “speaker rooms,” or not engage with event attendees. Just because someone isn’t another speaker at an event doesn’t mean they can’t be a valuable connection, resource or friend.

This means hanging out after your speech, checking out other speakers and talking with other people at the conference.

If you get selected to speak at an event you can have a larger than life persona on stage, but in the time before and after your speech you better be normal. Nobody likes a prima donna.

The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.
PUBLISHED ON: SEP 6, 2017

From a legend: these strategic communication principles

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Larry Litwin’s The Public Relations Practitioner’s Playbook for (all) Strategic Communicators contains dozens of important tips that assure effective persuasive public relations is achieved. Here is Play 2 from the books first chapter:

Ivy Ledbetter Lee professionalized public relations by following these principles: (ask yourself, Do you know any C-E-Os who do not follow these basic principles?

1. Tell the truth
2. Provide accurate facts
3. Give the public relations director access to top management so that he/she can influence decisions

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Take advantage of the power of a great story

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From the National School Public Relations Association — of which I have been a long-time member — comes this information about story telling and its value:

  • Stories create trust
  • We pay more attention to a story
  • We connect stories to our own lives
  • Stories break down walls of misunderstanding
  • Stories help parents identify with a school’s challenges and solutions
  • Haring stories with your staff reinforces values and school culture.

Visit www.nspra.org for much more information and the opportunity to become a member.

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From NSPRA – Tips to help staff connect with more parents

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From the National School Public Relations Associations comes these suggestions:

  • Hold an in-service training session on working with single parents
  • Work with your staff to schedule parent meetings and parent-teacher conferences at times convenient to parents
  • Insist that all staff practice good customer service
  • Encourage staff to give parents a chance to offer comments and ask questions when they communicate with them

Visit www.nspra.org for much more information and the opportunity to become a member.

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A potpourri – From ‘USA Today’

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Some “USA Snapshots” from USA Today. It gets full credit.

  • 41 percent of Americans cannot tell the difference between secure and unsecured Wi-Fi, but still take questionable actions (Norton by Symantec survey of 1,002 consumer
  • One in 14 computer users fall for phishing — being tricked into following a link or opening an attachment (Verizon’s 2017 Data Breach Investigation Report)
  • Lower pay, higher happiness: Almost half would be willing to take at least a 10 percent pay cut to work at a job they are more interested in and passionate about (Jobvite survey of 2,287 U.S. adults)

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Recovering from a bad interview

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CareerBuilder.com’s Sarah Sipek writes in detail about interview follow-ups.  Look for the entire article online or visit the Courier-Post Sunday, July 9 edition, page 16 C. In addition, http://larrylitwin.com/handouts.html contains many “handouts” on resumes and interview techniques.

Here are Sipek’s key points:

  • Send a thank-you note
  • Ask for a second chance
  • Don’t grovel
  • Reflect
  • Conduct mock interviews (practice practice practice

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6 Tips to help you get promoted

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From:

Dale Carnegie Training Newsletter

By Anita Zinsmeister, President
Dale Carnegie® Training of Central & Southern New Jersey 

  • Word count for this issue: 589
  • Approximate time to read: 2.4 minutes @ 250 words per minute  16 Mistakes Employees Make When Trying To Get A Promotion.          
  • Executive Summary:  Transitioning into a management position is never a simple process; however, the right approach will make a move more likely.  Educate yourself on what makes an effective leader by studying the habits of leaders you respect or enrolling in management training.  Fuse theoretical knowledge with applied skills by taking the initiative to demonstrate that you have the capacity to adequately fill a management position. 
  • 6.  Ask The Right Questions – Thinking like a manager means asking questions like a manager.  Focus on the aspects related to improving processes.  Asking questions designed to improve cost management, accomplishing tasks more efficiently, and meeting clients’ needs more effectively will demonstrate that you are serious about taking initiative.  To truly reinforce to others your desire to be a leader, have solutions to your proposed questions in mind.
  • 5.  Take The Initiative – The very best managers are the ones that are proactive.  These people don’t wait for things to come to them; instead, they take charge.  Come time for your quarterly or yearly review, ask your supervisor what steps you need to take to obtain a position in management.  Be sure to keep an eye on job postings at your company and recently vacant positions so that you may be in a position to seize upcoming opportunities.
  • 4.  Communicate Effectively – The cornerstone of being an effective professional at any level is the ability to communicate effectively. Understanding how others will interpret and react to issues that come up is a fundamental component that strong managers should always be aware of.  You must be able to communicate, respect, encourage and establish rapport with others to demonstrate that you have the capacity for leadership.
  • 3.  Do Your Job And Do It Well – If you are looking for a promotion at your current place of employment, you will want to excel in your current position. This, however, does not mean that you need to be the best at what you do (in fact, often, top performers are not always the best leaders).  Instead, focus on the leadership qualities of your job and ensure that you are a premier team player.
  • 2.  Enroll In Leadership Training Programs – Either as a supplement to or in conjunction with observing the habits of effective leaders, consider taking a course in leadership training.  A quick look through a search engine will turn up a wealth of results.  Be sure to perform your due diligence and ensure that the training you look into is highly rated.   
  • 1.  Study The Habits Of Quality Leaders – Truly, the best method for gaining an understanding of what people in management positions do is to observe people in those positions.  Study the techniques and habits of the managers whom you find effective.  Focus on how they interact with employees and how they encourage professional growth.
  • 6 Tips For Landing Your Next Promotion:
  •  
  • Click Here To Read Forbes’ Article

  • A promotion to management can signal a major milestone in any career.  While this is no simple task, there are a number of steps you can take to put yourself in a position to achieve this goal.  We have gathered six time-tested tips that can help you achieve the success you desire.

 

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‘Soft Skills’ can set YOU apart

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As Sarah Sipek of “CareerBuilder” writes in the Courier-Post, technical or hard skills are essential qualifications for a job, but “soft skills” focus on how you interact with others. For details visit careerbuilder.com. Here are the headings:

  • Communication
  • Ability to handle criticism
  • Attention to detail
  • Positive attitude
  • Time management

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