Technique to Succeed: Business dining: Dos and don’ts

[Questions? larry@larrylitwin.com]

There is much more in Litwin’s The Public relations Practitioner’s Playbook for (all) Strategic Communicators and The ABCs of Strategic Communication. Enjoy.

[From Jim Haney – General Manager – Palm Restaurant – Atlantic City NJ Courier-Post – Monday, April 4, 2005]

Some tips to help make your business dinner successful:

• Have fun, but remain professional.

• Dress appropriately.

• Pick the right restaurant for your affair, making sure the atmosphere fits the tone of your business outing. If you are looking to have a quiet business dinner, and don’t want to be disturbed by other diners, look for a place with private rooms or a very quiet environment.

• Go to a restaurant with which you are familiar. It’s not the best idea to go somewhere that you have never been before.

• Make reservations in advance – not the day of a business dinner. You’re usually safe on the same day during the week, but if you have a larger party you may be out of luck.

Limit the alcohol.

• Order food you like.Don’t order because of someone else.

• Make sure you have enough credit on your credit card if you arepaying thebill.

• Always take care of your server

From Jim Haney – General Manager – Palm Restaurant – Atlantic City NJ Courier-Post – Monday, April 4, 2005

[Questions? larry@larrylitwin.com]

3 Ways To Make Your Thank-You Note Stand Out After a Job Interview

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Larry is back after a few weeks of being slammed. Here, from ZipRecruiter on June 28, 2021 are Thank You Note tips. There is much more in Litwin’s The Public relations Practitioner’s Playbook for (all) Strategic CommunicatorsEnjoy. Questions? larry@larrylitwin.com…

You nailed the job interview! Or maybe you didn’t.

Either way, you still have one more chance to stand out and leave a good impression: the post-interview thank-you email.

(Yes, an email is perfectly acceptable. Especially these days when your interviewer could be working remotely.)

57% of job candidates don’t send a follow-up note after an interview. Which is bad for them, but good news for you. The secret to a good thank-you email is to talk about the interviewer, not yourself. A little-known secret about interviewers is that…they’re people too! And they love positive feedback just as much as you do.

Here are three ways to do it:

  1. Share How They Have Increased Your Enthusiasm

Hopefully, you conveyed how excited you were about the job during your interview. Your email can express how speaking with the interviewer kicked that excitement up another level. Then say why. This message will make the person you met feel good that they represented their company, and themselves, well. And when you make them feel good, they’ll feel good about you.

  1. Show That You Were Listening

For this approach, mention one or two topics that stuck with you. These could be anything they shared about the company, their department, or your industry as a whole. When you repeat something they said, it demonstrates that you were listening…and that your interviewer said something worth listening to.

  1. Highlight Their Best Moment

In this type of thank-you note, call out a question the interviewer asked or something they said, which taught you something or made you change your mind. Then, ask a related follow-up question. This is a great way to keep the conversation going, and gives you more opportunities to provide further insight into what you would contribute to the role.

A post-interview thank-you note is often the final impression you leave with a hiring manager. While your actual interview will likely be the main factor in whether you get the job, the right follow-up could seal the deal.

[For more: larry@larrylitwin.com]

Hashtag

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There is much more in Litwin’s The Public relations Practitioner’s Playbook for (all) Strategic Communicators and The ABCs of Strategic Communication. Enjoy.

Hashtag – The # symbol, called a hashtag (some refer to it as a hash mark),
is used to mark keywords or topics in a tweet. It was created by Twitter® users
as a way to categorize messages – tweets – by keyword. Also,(on-social-networking websites) a word or phrase preceded by a hashtag, used within a
message to identify a keyword or topic of interest  and facilitate a search for it
(e.g. The hashtag #PRPractitioner’sPlaybook is used to help coordinate tweets
about The Public Relations Practitioner’s Playbook for (all) Strategic
Communicators.)

[Questions? larry@larrylitwin.com]

Hard Money vs. Soft Money

There is much more in Litwin’s The Public relations Practitioner’s Playbook for (all) Strategic Communicators and The ABCs of Strategic Communication. Enjoy.

Hard Money = Donations made directly to a political candidate. Hard
money is regulated by federal laws (Federal Election Commission) that
limit the amount a person can donate to a candidate.

[Questions? larry@larrylitwin.com]

Crowd Funding

There is much more in Litwin’s The Public relations Practitioner’s Playbook for (all) Strategic Communicators and The ABCs of Strategic Communication. Enjoy.

Crowd Funding = Using social media or other Internet site (e.g.
kickstarter®) to raise money for charities, starting a business or other
“legitimate project or venture.

[For more: larry@larrylitwin.com]

Cosmeceutical

There is much more in Litwin’s The Public relations Practitioner’s Playbook for (all) Strategic Communicators and The ABCs of Strategic Communication. Enjoy.

Cosmeceutical = A combination cosmetic and pharmaceutical. A
cosmetic claiming to have medicinal benefits. Cosmeceuticals are usually
topically applied – lotions, creams and ointments.

[For more: larry@larrylitwin.com]

Habits of the highly employable that you can pick up

[Questions – larry@larrylitwin.com]

From the Courier-Post and “the job network” on Jan. 28, 2021. Check out the full story.

In a job search, it can be so easy to fall into ruts and passive roles while you wait for things to happen. If you are looking to refresh yourself and your “hireability” in going forward, there are several things that highly employable people do — and you can, too.

  1. Be proactive
  2. Know your worth
  3. Keep that network up and running
  4. Take ownership
  5. Be a good listener
  6. Always be growing
  7. Be positive

[Questions – larry@larrylitwin.com]

Take Aways from Amazon Career day

[Questions – larry@larrylitwin.com]

From ZipRecruiter and Courier-Post on October 18, 2020

  1. When it comes to your resume, simple is better
  2. Be honest about gaps
  3. New qualifications or certifications can help
  4. The interview isn’t about you

[Questions – larry@larrylitwin.com]

PRSA Member Statement of Professional Values

[Questions? larry@larryitwin.com]

This statement presents the core values of PRSA members and,
more broadly, of the public relations profession. These values provide
the foundation for the Member Code of Ethics and set the
industry standard for the professional practice of public relations.
These values are the fundamental beliefs that guide our behaviors
and decision-making process. We believe our professional values
are vital to the integrity of the profession as a whole.
ADVOCACY
We serve the public interest by acting as responsible advocates for
those we represent. We provide a voice in the marketplace of ideas,
facts, and viewpoints to aid informed public debate.
HONESTY
We adhere to the highest standards of accuracy and truth in
advancing the interests of those we represent and in communicating
with the public.
EXPERTISE
We acquire and responsibly use specialized knowledge and experience.
We advance the profession through continued professional
development, research and education. We build mutual understanding,
credibility, and relationships among a wide array of institutions
and audiences.
INDEPENDENCE
We provide objective counsel to those we represent. We are
accountable for our actions.
LOYALTY
We are faithful to those we represent, while honoring our obligation
to serve the public interest.
FAIRNESS
We deal fairly with clients, employers, competitors, peers, vendors,
the media and the general public. We respect all opinions and support
the right of free expression.

[Questions? larry@larryitwin.com]

PRSA’s 10 principles of behavior for the practice of public relations

[Questions: larry@larrylitwin.com]

In summary, PRSA lists the following 10 principles of behavior for
the practice of public relations:
1. Conduct in accord with the public interest.
2. Exemplify high standards of honesty and integrity.
3. Deal fairly with the public.
4. Adhere to highest standards of accuracy and truth.
5. Do not knowingly disseminate false or misleading
information.
6. Do not engage in any practice that corrupts the channels
of communication or processes of government.
7. Identify publicly the name of the client or employer on whose
behalf any public communication is made.
8. Do not make use of any individual or organization
professing to be independent or unbiased but actually
serving another or undisclosed interest.
9. Do not guarantee the achievement of specified results beyond
member’s control.
10. Do not represent conflicting or competing interests.

[Questions: larry@larrylitwin.com]