More on resumes

Questions: Visit www.LarryLitwin.com or write larry@larrylitwin.com

  • More than one page is recommended unless you do not have sufficient experience and education to fill the space. Do not “pad” the content. You will be flagged (by H.R.) immediately.
  • Pick a flexible format. I like traditional. But now, there are many. Do not commit “vampire creativity. That’s where the format overwhelms the message — or sucks the blood out of it.
  • Edit, edit and edit some more. No grammar, spelling, punctuation, syntax or sentence structure errors. Accuracy is paramount. Better writing through self edition. That’s what Professor Frank Grazian always taught his students — and I do, too.
  • “Tweak” the experience points.

Questions: Visit LarryLitwin.com or write larry@larrylitwin.com

4 questions to ask during YOUR job or internship interview

Kate Lopaz of the THEJOBNETWORK writes the follwing. Get her full story on line. Questions? mlarrylitwin@gmail.com.

  1. “How would you describe the culture here in the office and the workplace?”
  2. “What’s been your favorite part about working for this company?”
  3. “What experience best prepared you for working here?”
  4. “How would you describe the leadership style here?”

Visit www.larrylitwin.com.
Questions? mlarrylitwin@gmail.com

How to describe yourself in a job interview

This comes from Peter Jones at THEJOBNETWORK. For more, visit www.larrylitwin.com Here are eight powerful examples interviewers are sure to love.

Here are eight powerful examples interviewers are sure to love:

  1. Communicative
  2. Reliable
  3. Driven
  4. Meticulous
  5. Impactful
  6. Persistent
  7. Flexible
  8. Team player
    This comes from Peter Jones at THEJOBNETWORK. For more, visit www.larrylitwin.com or write mlarrylitwin@gmail.com

How to answer tough interview questions

Here are six standard, but tough interview questions. For the short snappy answers visit Peter Jones at THEJOBNETWORK or ask Prof. Litwin in class. For more, visit www.larrylitwin.com or write mlarrylitwin@gmail.com

  1. Why you left your last job
  2. Your greatest weakness
  3. Why you seem overqualified
  4. Why you’ve changed jobs a lot
  5. Why you’ve been unemployed for ages
  6. Your age (They are not permitted to ask this question, but some do. Develop your strategic response)
    This comes from Peter Jones at THEJOBNETWORK. For more, visit www.larrylitwin.com or write mlarrylitwin@gmail.com

Is YOUR personal brand doing well?

[To comment: larry@larrylitwin.com]  From Larry’s ABCs of Strategic Communication come the following:

  1. Google yourself regularly
  2. Do frequent social media sweeps

Tips to Succeed:Do you have a brand? – Evaluate your 5 Ps

Your brand consists of a complex set of characteristics and dynamics
that play out in thousands of scenarios each workday.
You can use your brand to positively influence your image to others
and enhance your career using these five Ps:
Persona – The emotional connection and reaction you elicit from
other people as a result of your personal style.
Product – The sum of your qualifications, experience, technical
and/or functional expertise, ideas and results you’ve delivered
over time.
Packaging – The presentation of your personal appearance, surroundings
and tangible results of projects and assignments on the
job.
Promotion – The way you inform your market about your value
and impact.
Permission – The sense of legitimacy, confidence and core belief
that you have important contributions to make.

Thank you to Susan Hodgkinson – The Leader’s Edge

To comment: larry@larrylitwin.com

7 Tips To Becoming More Valuable in the Next 12 Months

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This week’s blog comes from 

Dale Carnegie Training Newsletter

By Anita Zinsmeister

In The Next 12 Months:

1.  Become More Confident – When you believe in your abilities, others will too.  It starts with your body language.  Carry yourself with confidence and others will take notice.
 
2.  Ask For More Responsibility – Doing more than your job requires or asking for additional responsibilities shows that you are eager for a promotion.  But be sure you are ready to work hard.
 
3.  Share Your Ideas To Improve The Business Or Process- If you have an idea that will add value to your company, speak up.   The worst your manager can say is, “no.”  At the very least, it shows that you want to contribute.
 
4.  Start Writing Articles (Or Videos) On Social Media – Social media is a great way to tell a broad audience about your goods, services or skills. Create a Facebook page, a LinkedIn profile or a Twitter account.   Then regularly post relevant content on topics within your area of expertise.
 
5.  Develop A Blog (WordPress)- Like to write?   Why not start a blog? Blogging about industry topics that interest you is yet another way to promote your expertise.  Tools such as WordPress make it easy to get started.  If you have a website, be sure to add a link to your posts.
 
6.  Network, Network, And Network Again – Attending local networking events can also be useful.  When independently promoting yourself, consider offering your services in exchange for goods or services that are useful to you.  This is a great way to get a prospect to sample your work without having to commit to a long-term business relationship.  If your product or performance exceeds expectations, it is likely you’ll gain a new client — and some referrals.
 
7.  Keep An Ample Supply Of Business Cards On You – In today’s digital world, business cards may seem a bit old-fashioned.  Yet they are still one of the most effective marketing tools.   Use your card as an opportunity to promote your business.
 
Executive Summary:  Promoting yourself can be a challenge, especially if you are modest.  But a little self-confidence can go a long way.  Here are some more tips for you:
 
  • If your goal is a promotion, take on more responsibility at work.
  • Speak up if you have a good idea.
  • Take advantage of social media, blogging and other online tools to get your name and talents noticed by a broader audience.
  • Self-promotion may take a little work, but the payoff could be a big career boost in the upcoming year.

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How exercise can boost work performance

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This is excellent advice via the Courier-Post on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018:

BY ERIC TITNER

THEJOBNETWORK.COM

We’re all familiar with the obvious benefits of exercise — regular physical activity can keep us looking and feeling fit and healthy, increase our energy levels and confidence and help us maintain high levels of self-esteem. Staying active can also help us fight off a wealth of potentially life-threatening illnesses.

If you’re still not sold, perhaps this will help seal the deal — exercise helps fuel and maintain a healthy body, and it can actually improve your ability to think and retain information.

WHAT EXERCISE DOES

Recent studies have shown the following cognitive benefits of exercise:

Boosts brainpower: If you’re looking to take your brain’s ability to the next level, you can’t do much better than regular exercise. Studies have shown that exercise can actually increase the volume of key areas in your brain.

Enhances thinking ability: Regular workouts will help kick away the dreaded “brain fog” that keeps you from thinking clearly and keep your mind and thoughts razor sharp all day long.

Helps you process and remember new information more effectively: If you’re trying to acquire a new skill or task, like learning a new language or tackling a new job responsibility, combining it with regular exercise can help. New research suggests that physical activity can increase the size of the medial temporal and pre-frontal cortex of your brain, key areas that regulate and control thinking and memory, so you’ll be able to master that new skill faster.

Improves ability on cognitive tasks: Do you have an important test for work or school coming up? Whatever your mental goals are, exercise will help you succeed on all sorts of cognitive tasks that test your intelligence and brainpower.

Keeps away the negatives: Regular exercise will help keep your mood positive and upbeat, help you achieve more restful sleep at night and help reduce anxiety and stress, ensuring your brain works at its best.

WHEN, WHAT AND HOW MUCH?

Now that you know it works, let’s explore how you can make it work for you.

Although there’s some debate regarding the type of exercise that best serves to promote brain function, according to a recent article by Harvard Medical School, “researchers found that regular aerobic exercise, the kind that gets your heart and your sweat glands pumping, appears to boost the size of the hippocampus, the brain area involved in verbal memory and learning. Resistance training, balance and muscle toning exercises did not have the same results.”

Research also suggests that although you’ll receive a brain benefit regardless of when you decide to exercise, the most promising results typically occur when you do your workout before or even during a cognitive task.

Another big question you might be wondering about is how much exercise you should do in order to receive a cognitive benefit. The same Harvard Medical School report suggests that “standard recommendations advise half an hour of moderate physical activity most days of the week, or 150 minutes a week.”

If you’re worried that you’re simply too busy to exercise or find the very idea of exercise daunting, a great way to take a step forward toward a regular active lifestyle is to start small. Try taking a brief yet brisk walk for 10 to 15 minutes each day, and gradually increase your workout in both length and intensity as time passes.

Now that you know all about the many benefits that exercise will bring to your life, put the excuses aside and get up and get moving toward yoursuccessful future!

Eric Titner is a career advice journalist for TheJobNetwork.com, where this article was originally published. He investigates and writes about current strategies, tips and trending topics related to all stages of one’s career.

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11 Experts Predict the Future of Content Marketing in 2018

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From Inc.
 
Reaching the members of your audience through a content-cluttered landscape — and their ad blockers — will be harder than ever in 2018. Fortunately, there are new technologies and techniques that can help.

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5 rare public speaking tricks the best presenters use

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Inc.s Janice Tomich wrote this article, first published on Jun. 25, 2016:

When you’re giving a speech, you need to be different, like Mary Meeker was when she recently delivered her presentation at the 2016 Code Conference.

She challenged the trend of using an image-heavy presentation style delivering 213 data-dense slides in 24 minutes and 40 seconds while sharing her 2016 Trends Report.

Rather than speaking at great length to her slides, Ms. Meeker moved at lightning speed spending about seven seconds on each one.

Image-heavy presentations aren’t the only traditional trends you should avoid. A few more examples:

  • Talk about yourself and your authority ad nauseam
  • Blatantly repeat your key message three or more times
  • Always use a slidedeck — no matter the circumstances
  • Count the number of ums and ahs that pass your lips
  • Sell from the stage

If you fall into the trap of misguided techniques, you’ll be lost in the sea of noise and no different than every other speaker.

How do I know? Whenever it’s possible, I attend my client’s presentations. I sit near the front, close to a wall, so I’m able to do an inconspicuous 180 to evaluate audience reactions. My eyes and ears are listening and watching for the nuances of persuasiveness — those that are connecting and the ones that aren’t.

Here are five things you can do instead of following old-school public speaking instructions if you want to excite your audience:

Provide a skinny version of your CV

I’m talking really skinny. Three or four lines that tell the story of why you are the person who is best suited to speak.

Have someone introduce you and be dogged about having them repeat your short bio word for word. If you’re not able to have someone introduce you with a delicate hand, thread your credentials throughout your speech in places where it aligns conceptually to illustrate your experience.

Be stealth-like when using repetition

What do you think when someone constantly repeats themself to try to persuade you? I think they’re either “a dog with a bone” and are in desperation mode to sell me, or they underestimate my intelligence.

You need to be savvy when building in repetition to have your key message stick into hearts and minds. Use a variety of learning methods or phrase your key message in different ways.

For example, you can ask a question to draw out what you want to be remembered, use the power of gestures to illuminate your point, or switch up every fifth image (the keystones) for contrast in your PowerPoint decks.

There are times you shouldn’t use a PowerPoint deck

We’ve been conditioned to believe that every presentation needs to use a slidedeck and that everyone who can turn on a computer is a graphic design pro.

Ask yourself, “Do I really need slides to support my ideas and can I make it look professional in the time I have?” Consider how you’ll stand out while being different than most presenters when you’re front and center and simply speaking of what you know.

No one is counting your verbal ticks

Toastmasters is a fantastic venue for practicing. It’s a low cost opportunity to create a habitual practice for improving your pubic speaking skills.

There is one aspect of Toastmasters I have issue with. It’s the counting of verbal ticks such as ums and ahs. If I had someone counting the number of times I say “right” it would stress me out.

That aside, you have your unique tics and nuances that make you, you, and without them, you’d come across as predictable and over polished. I do draw a line, though. When verbal ticks are distracting, work to alleviate them so you’ll communicate with easy flow.

It’s not OK to sell from the stage

If you’ve provided a stream of helpful information, those who see you as the one to solve their problem will reach out to you. Whether people contact you or not is one of the strongest indicators of a successful presentation.

You’ve been warned. Old tired techniques will  irritate your audience and put up a barrier to winning them over. Excite them instead. 

Read the original article on Inc.. Copyright 2016. Follow Inc. on Twitter.

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