5 Ways To Help Your Team Feel Appreciated When Working Remotely

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From:

Dale Carnegie Training Newsletter
By: Anita Zinsmeister, President
Dale Carnegie® Training of Central & Southern New Jersey
Employee engagement increases in companies that have strong teams. Likewise, a competent team can singlehandedly cut operating costs and reduce the amount of workplace stress.  A team that communicates frequently develops skills that lessen the chance of mistakes that are typically the result of a disjointed team.
 
5 Tips To Help Create A More Effective Remote Team
 
1. Empower Your Team Members – Encourage your team members to be self-managed and a contributing member to the team. Doing so will boost their productivity; however, you do have to encourage and monitor your staff by assigning specific responsibilities and due dates.  Doing so will help promote and foster a culture that harnesses forward-thinking strategies and generates results.
 
2. Ask Everyone For Their Opinion – An “open-door policy” isn’t compelling enough at soliciting frequent feedback from your team.  Establish a system for generating direct and candid feedback.  Furthermore, when evaluating your employees, promote an environment of positive discussion by communicating in a clear and focused manner. To help augment the opinion process, set up a brief meeting with all team members to get their opinion on what is and isn’t working.  Additionally, it might also make sense to have individual meetings to help better solicit each member’s opinion. 
 
3. Get Your People To Buy Into A Team – Team members should understand that the success of their individual career is tied directly to the trajectory of the group and company.  Team-building exercises are great opportunities for every member to feel included and valued. Encourage team members by complimenting positive examples of teamwork as you see them happen.  A team is most effective when it acts as a united front, and every member should be supported, so they feel like they are part of the team.
 
4. Focus On Efficient Execution – Consider the structure of your organization before your team-building exercise commences.  Large teams might need to arrange a central leadership team to make planning and execution more manageable.  Each sub-team requires equal time, treatment, and resources.  Monitor each team to make sure no one person is taking on too much control, responsibility, or the feeling of being overwhelmed.
 
5. Conduct Team Building Activities – Remote team-building activities are great ways to build camaraderie between employees.  As you introduce a team-building activity, structure, or exercise to your employees, be sure to include the expectation for the activity.  Not only should you explain the rules of the exercise, but you should also provide team members with the goal they should achieve.
 
Executive Summary:  A strong team works more effectively and efficiently — all in an effort to increase productivity and results.  The key to encouraging individuals to operate as a team typically comes down to healthy communication.  Make your expectations known and promote direct and candid feedback from team members.  Empower your team by putting them in a position to succeed and encourage everyone to take part in problem-solving to encourage positive attitudes and results. 

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26 industries that have added jobs

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By ZipRecruiter.com

The U.S. economy lost 22 million jobs between February and April, and had only recovered 42% of them by July, according to the latest jobs report.

But not all industries contracted during the pandemic. Some added thousands of employees to meet surging demand for groceries, gardening supplies, hand sanitizer, sewing machines, ventilators, video game consoles, plexiglass sneeze guards and mortgage refinancing, among other goods and services.

Here are the 26 industries that have added the largest numbers of jobs to the economy since February:

1. Warehouse clubs and supercenters:

156.9K

2. Supermarkets and grocery stores:

95.2K

3. Building material and garden supply stores: 62.2K

4. The federal government (excluding the post office): 48.9K

5. Couriers and express delivery services: 45.7K

6. Local messengers and delivery and private postal service: 14.3K

7. Children’s and infants’ clothing stores: 10K

8. Tax preparation services: 8.3K

9. Mortgage and nonmortgage loan brokers: 6K

10. Surgical appliances and supplies manufacturers: 5.3K

11. Internet publishing and broadcasting and web search portals: 4.2K 12. Direct life insurance carriers:

3.9K

13. Department of Defense: 3.6K

14. Farm product raw materials wholesalers (including of grains and field beans): 3.4K

15. Animal slaughtering: 2.9K

16. Securities Brokerage: 2.8K

17. Claims adjusting: 2.8K

18. Consumer lending: 2.6K

19. Scientific research and development services: 2.4K

20. Miscellaneous computer and electronic products manufacturers: 2.2K

21. Soaps and cleaning compounds manufacturers: 1.9K

22. State hospitals: 1.7K

23. Direct property and casualty insurers: 1.7K

24. Sewing, needlework and piece goods stores: 1.6K

25. Plastics packaging

materials, film and sheet: 1.6K

26. Investment advice: 1.6K

Other jobs report findings

• Performing arts and spectator sports lost 12.8K jobs in July as fall and winter season events were canceled or pared back. That industry now employs fewer than half as many as it did last year (253.7K vs. 514.2K). State mass layoff notices for July read like a list of the nation’s top orchestras, theaters, opera houses and sporting venues.

• Several high-wage industries where jobs can be performed from home continued to struggle as businesses sought to defray pandemic-related revenue losses.

For example, employment declines continued in management of companies and enterprises (-12.2K), advertising and related services (-8.2K), computer systems design (-7K) and publishing industries (-6.9K).

• Employment in support activities for mining (-10.6k) also continued to contract, as anemic global demand thwarted a recovery in commodity prices.

• As of July, payroll employment was lower than its pre-COVID February level by 12.9 million jobs (or 8.4%). In other words, the pandemic has sent the economy back to 2014-level numbers of jobs. Payroll employment now needs to grow by about 2.6 million per month to recover by the end of the year.

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Get hired after you quit

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From ZipRecruiter in the Courier-Post on Sept. 6, 2020. By Zip’s Nicole Cavazos

If you’ve realized that quitting your last job was a mistake and you want to get rehired, all is not lost. You can redeem yourself with your ex-boss as long as you left on reasonably good terms. And even if you did not, you still might have a chance.

Here are five steps to make amends.

  1. Know where you stand
  2. Realize what went wrong
  3. Prepare your explanation
  4. Make your case
  5. Ask for a fresh start.

 

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The Dollar Bill Test

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Dear friend and layout expert Rowan University Professor Claudia Cuddy, ret., came up with this many years ago. It remains applicable as you can see in The Public Relations Practitioners Playbook for (all) Strategic Communicators (Chapter 12).

The Dollar Bill Test is simple:

Take a dollar bill and turn it on a page of copy. To pass the Dollar Bill Test, it must touch at least one copybreaker. If it does, your publication passes. If not, it fails.
Professor Cuddy has her own list of copybreakers to assure publications pass the Dollar Bill Test:

• Heads
• Subheads
• Pull quotes (Blurbs)
• Rules
• Initial (or drop) caps
• Shaded (screened) boxes
• Pictures
• Art (line art)
• Bullet lists

There is much more in The PR PlaybookFor a copy, visit www.authorhouse.com

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Benchmark – A definition

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This comes to you from The Public Relations Practitioner’s Playbook for (all) Strategic Communicators by M. Larry Litwin (visit www.larrylitwin.com)

PR Play 4-2
Benchmark
• A standard for comparing similar items such as research findings,
the creative elements of a campaign, advertising results, etc.
• A point of reference – baseline. (A person or organization that
others aspire to match or exceed.)
• A standard for comparing products to determine competitors’
costs and quality with one’s own.

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Benchmark Study

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This comes to you from The Public Relations Practitioner’s Playbook for (all) Strategic Communicators by M. Larry Litwin (visit www.larrylitwin.com)

PR Play 4-3
Benchmark Study
A measurement of audience attitudes before and after a (strategic)
public relations campaign. A starting point (baseline) so that behavioral
change can be accurately measured.
Source: Eileen Weisman – The W Group – Houston, Texas

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This comes to you from The Public Relations Practitioner’s Playbook for (all) Strategic Communicators by M. Larry Litwin (visit www.larrylitwin.com)

5 reasons you should invest in employee development now

Comments or questions? larry@larrylitwin.com

Thank you to Kate Lopaze of thejobnetwork for writing the full version of this article for the Courier-Post on Sunday, July 12, 2020.

With everything so uncertain right now, it may be hard to see how your organization moves forward and where you should be focusing your resources. Many companies are concerned about the impacts of coronavirus and the economic downturn on their bottom lines, and the idea of focusing precious time and money on employee development may not be top of mind. Still, your organization should consider investing in your employee development right now. Let’s take a closer look at why.

1. It’s building your organization’s future

Honestly, many workers are just happy to have a job right now, and many companies are content to stay afloat while navigating choppy waters. However, things will likely calm down soon, and as the new normal settles in you’ll want to be prepared with the best workforce possible. Focusing on employee retention and development takes advantage of questions you’re likely already asking, such as what kind of leadership is working for your organization, what you need from your employees, and what kind of changes are coming your way.

2. It improves your employer brand

Employee-focused organizations get more positive feedback from current and former employees. In a world where online word of mouth can be everything, this is how you appeal to the best talent. When your team knows that you’re invested in their needs and their development, it builds good word-of-mouth and keeps great employees from seeking opportunities elsewhere.

Employee retention is one of the biggest challenges for any organization. If you’re retaining your best employees and keeping churn low by meeting employee needs and expectations, it enhances your reputation as a great place to work.

3. It gives you more insight into your employees’ potential

Part of any employee development program is assessing the strengths and weaknesses of your current employee pool and identifying both areas for improvement and for the potential for promotion. This legwork helps build a pipeline of internal candidates for promotions or for open positions within the company.

Similarly, knowing any weak spots improves your fortunes as well—better to nip any issues in the bud at an early stage, when intervention can help you put the right people in the right places or move people away from areas where they’re not going to perform well.

4. Engaged employees are productive employees

Employee boredom or restlessness is rarely a good thing in any organization. It either hurts productivity as employees start to become emotionally distant from their jobs, or leads to quality employees looking elsewhere for a more satisfying job. The feedback and data you get during an employee development audit and implementation are essential to help you find ways to keep employees engaged and invested in the organization’s success.

Training programs, skill development programs, and asking employees for feedback are all ways to keep your workers from feeling disengaged or stagnant in their daily work.

5. Employee development makes good financial sense

Hiring is typically one of the biggest resource investments for any organization—searching for talent, interviewing, hiring, and onboarding are intricate processes that involve many touchpoints and significant costs. Having in-house talent you can use to fill leadership roles (or lateral roles in the company) helps cut down on the external hiring processes that you would otherwise need to do.

Whether you’re trying to attract new talent to your changed organizational landscape or keep the great employees you already have, a strong employee development program can help you get where you need to be—both in the short term and the long term. The time and attention you focus on growing employee skill sets and supporting their potential are some of the most important strategic tools you have as a hiring professional.

The post 5 reasons you should invest in employee development now appeared first on TheJobNetwork on July 8, 2020

 

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6 Questions Recruiters Ask — And How to Answer Them

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Kate Lupaze of thejobnetwork writes in The Courier-Post the following:

  1. Tell me about yourself
  2. Tell me about your current (or most recent job)
  3. What is your highest achievement?
  4. What is your biggest weakness?
  5. What is your next step?
  6. Are you working with other recruiters?

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5 Tips To Help Improve Your Presentation Skills

Questions? larry@larrylitwin.com and check out The Public Relations Playbook for (all) Strategic Communicators

This comes from Dale Carnegie Training News Letter:

By Anita Zinsmeister, President
Dale Carnegie® Training of Central & Southern New Jersey

  • Word Count: 486
  • Time To Read: 1.9 Minutes @ 250 Words Per Minute

An excellent presentation is a result of being dynamic, engaging, and interesting. Without these things, you won’t be able to hold your audience’s attention, and your presentation will not be memorable. To make sure your presentation makes an impact, you need to prepare appropriately.

The Key To Success Will Be In Your Preparation.

A common misconception is this: great speakers get it right on the first try. This is seldom true. The presentation likely went through several drafts and was adjusted multiple times.

Click Here To Read Inc.’s Article: 15 Ways to Calm Your Nerves Before a Big Presentation.

To help you jump-start your next presentation, we have listed a few tips below.

5 Tips To Improve As A Presenter.

1. Focus On Your Body Language – People pay attention to your body language consciously and subconsciously. If you fidget, cross your arms, hunch over, or fail to keep eye contact, your audience will notice. Stay confident, smile, and hold yourself in an engaging way to make a connection with your audience.

2. Include Stories – Finding a way to tie in your personal experiences is a great way to make an audience more engaged. Show them how your ideas work in real life by giving them a practical example. This will draw them in and let them connect on a personal level.

3. Research Your Audience – Whom will you be speaking to? This has an effect on how you speak and what you include in your presentation. Are they experts in their field? Are they familiar with the topic? Are they looking in from the outside? If they are new to the topic, you might need to include definitions of common terms.

4. Prepare Yourself Mentally – Before you begin, take time to calm your mind. There are many examples of ways to get yourself in the right head-space for a presentation. Not all of them will work for you. You need to find your way to inner peace. Some become calm by listening to loud music. Others need complete silence. Figure out what works best for you.

5. Always Practice – The two main factors of a good presentation are how well you know the material and how comfortable you are speaking to an audience. You can work on both by practicing.

Practice in front of a mirror to get the content down and to focus on your body language. When you feel confident in those aspects, practice in front of friends or colleagues. You’ll be able to get some of the jitters out and get feedback.

Executive Summary: Your final presentation is only a small part of what the audience sees. They don’t see the research, changes, refinement, and effort it takes to make an excellent presentation. You’ll be able to stand out by properly preparing and practicing. Start by focusing on your body language, and make sure you practice in front of a small audience first.

Questions? larry@larrylitwin.com and check out The Public Relations Playbook for (all) Strategic Communicators